Liberia: Mo Ibrahim, World Leaders Pay Tributes to Archbishop Tutu

The Mo Ibrahim Foundation on Sunday join world leaders and organizations around the world in paying tribute to the late South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu.

Archbishop Tutu passed on Sunday December 26, 2021, he was 90.

The Mo Ibrahim Foundation in its tribute described the late Archbishop as “one of its greatest sons, a man who spent his entire life working on behalf of others and who was a tireless champion of human rights.”

According to the Foundation, the late Archbishop Tutu “through his uncompromising integrity and courage, Archbishop Desmond Tutu was pivotal in defeating the scourge of apartheid in South Africa, and then in helping his country heal its wounds and begin the long process of reconciliation.

It added that Archbishop Tutu’s consistent determination to speak truth to power inspired people around the world. In recognition of this work, my foundation was delighted to present Archbishop Tutu with a Special Award in 2012.

“On a more personal note, I have lost a dear friend. I always felt so privileged to be in his presence. My deepest condolences to his wife Leah and their family,” Mo Ibrahim added.

Other world leaders such as former US President Barrack Obama who said: “Archbishop Tutu was grounded in the struggle for liberation and justice in his own country, but also concerned with injustice everywhere.”

“He never lost his impish sense of humour and willingness to find humanity in his adversaries, and Michelle and I will miss him dearly.”

South African President Ramaphosa said he was “an iconic spiritual leader, anti-apartheid activist and global human rights campaigner”.

He described him as “a patriot without equal; a leader of principle and pragmatism who gave meaning to the biblical insight that faith without works is dead”.

“A man of extraordinary intellect, integrity and invincibility against the forces of apartheid, he was also tender and vulnerable in his compassion for those who had suffered oppression, injustice and violence under apartheid, and oppressed and downtrodden people around the world.”

In a message of condolence, the Queen said she remembered with fondness her meetings with him, and his great warmth and humour.

“Archbishop Tutu’s loss will be felt by the people of South Africa and by so many people in Great Britain, Northern Ireland, and across the Commonwealth, where he was held in such high affection and esteem.”

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